Suicide Rates on the Rise

A very recent article (October 21, 2013) reports a disturbing increase in suicides:

Suicide Rate Climbs by 30 Percent in Kansas as Government Slashes Mental Health Budgets

Actually, its a 31.5% increase: from 384 deaths in 2011 to 505 in 2012.

Detailed report:

http://tinyurl.com/le8wrux

A trend?

Of note:

Nationally, the CDC reported a spike in suicide rates in 2010 among the middle-aged, a 28 percent rise overall, a 40 percent jump among white Americans, and among men in their 50s, suicides increased by more than 48 percent. Guns remained the leading method used in all suicides, followed by poisoning, overdoses, and suffocation.

http://tinyurl.com/lem9cpt

And:

More people in the U.S. die from suicide than car accidents. That’s according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control, which also found that the suicide rate among adults age 35 and 64 has risen 28 percent. Ray Suarez talks with CDC director Dr. Thomas Frieden about contributing risks and measures for prevention.

http://tinyurl.com/dyozwep

Reportedly, there is “a stunning increase in the suicide rate among middle-aged Americans.” (new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

In 2010, there were more suicides in the U.S., 38,000-plus, than there were fatal motor vehicle accidents. Most disturbing, that spike among the middle-aged, a 28 percent rise overall, a 40 percent jump among white Americans, and among men in their 50s, suicides increased by more than 48 percent. Guns remained the leading method used in all suicides, followed by poisoning, overdoses and suffocation.

Questions are raised as to why the increase. Several possible explanations for the spike are proposed.

This sounds ominous:

Even though there have been horrific stories in the news related to the nation’s poor mental health care of its citizens (Aaron Alexis’ attack in Washington’s Navy Yard and Miriam Carey’s murder by DC police), officials seem determined to continue slashing funding.

Will we see a continuing trend? And what factors can be teased out as to having statistical significance?

 

Roy

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