NYC Marathon

You’ve all heard, the New York City Marathon is back in “business.”

The 2012 marathon was canceled “about 36 hours before the scheduled start, with significant logistical and monetary fallout.”

See:

http://tinyurl.com/mvgtz88

Sandy had other plans, and the New York City Marathon was one casualty amidst a long string of casualties a year ago.

But, we’re back. Not, however, without any trepidation. Anticipated excitement, and an activity that likely will have a curative effect pursuant to so much devastation, has to brace itself for heightened security and safety concerns because of a non-Sandy tragedy: the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, 2013 that left 5 dead and 280 injured (including 16 cops during a gunfight on April 19).

The November 3 race will have more inspection points and race coordinators are banning items such backpacks and hydration packs, Farrell Sklerov, spokesman for the New York Road Runners told CNN.

Spectators at the end of the race who wish to watch from grandstands and those in the family reunion area will be subject to baggage inspections and screenings, according to the marathon’s website.

See:

http://tinyurl.com/lg3nrdt

And:

The 2001 marathon took place less than two months after the Sept. 11 attacks, so security has been heightened ever since. Now it will be tightened even more.

Securing the start at Staten Island is straightforward because of its location – Fort Wadsworth. The bridges on the race course are similarly restrictive.

But the finish is in Central Park, a sprawling public space. Barriers will be erected around it, and people can enter only through a few designated checkpoints where bags will be searched. There will be additional checkpoints to reach the marathon course.

http://tinyurl.com/mf4aom3

Thus, fallout from two sources of trauma: natural and human-made.

Perhaps a minor point, but this Sunday we “fall back” to standard time at 2 a.m., so runners should get an extra hour of sleep.

 

Roy

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